Posts Tagged brain teaser

Quick brain teaser to stretch your mind and understand your cognitive biases


_______________

This is Ellen, a single and bright woman. When she was a student —in high school and in college too— Ellen was deeply involved in environmental issues, and also participated in social justice protests.

Now it’s 2019, and Ellen is 31-year-old.

Question: Which of the following statements are more probable regarding Ellen’s occupation today, and in what order?

A) Ellen is a bank teller;

B) Ellen works as a TV reporter;

C) Ellen is a bank teller at a small community bank; she remains active fighting climate change.

 

Quick, what’s your answer? In what order would you rank those 3 options? Read the rest of this entry »

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Brain teaser to exercise those temporal lobes

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Language is processed in the temporal lobes, on the sides of your brain, next to you temples.

Different areas in the temporal lobes (mostly on the left side) deal with different aspects of language. For instance, the Wernicke area supports your ability to understand words. The Broca area, on the other hand, is the one that allows you to produce language or articulate words.

Let’s try a fun brain teaser to help exercise your brain’s language areas…are you ready to stimulate all those neurons in your temporal lobes?

Read each definition and try to find the corresponding word.

(Answers are below, but don’t check them until you have tried!)

Tease your brain:

_________________ = A plant having a permanently woody main stem, usually growing to a high height, and developing branches at some distance from the ground.

_________________ = A large, usually tawny-yellow cat, native to Africa and southern Asia, having a tufted tail.

_________________ = The nutritious, orange to yellow root of a plant of the parsley family.

_________________ = An article of furniture consisting of a flat top supported on one or more legs.

_________________ = An institution where instruction is given.

_________________ = A moving cage for carrying passengers from one level to another.

_________________ = A device for transmission of sound or speech to a distant point

_________________ = a body of water of considerable size, surrounded by land.

_________________ = A domestic fowl bred for its flesh, eggs, and feathers.

_________________ = A shallow, usually circular dish from which food is eaten.

_________________ = A precipitation in the form of ice crystals.

_________________ = Any circulating medium of exchange

 

 

Answers

Tree
Lion
Carrot
Table
School
Elevator
Telephone
Lake
Chicken
Plate
Snow
Money

 

For more cognitive stimulation, visit these Top 25 Brain Teasers for Teens and Adults, and explore What are Cognitive Abilities and Skills, and How to Boost Them?

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Are you familiar with these research findings and neurotechnologies revolutionizing Brain & Mental Health?

Try adding 3 and 8 in your head.

That was easy. Now, trying adding 33 and 88. That was probably more difficult. Finally, try adding 333 and 888.

Time for SharpBrains’ October e-newsletter, this time discussing a range of research findings and technologies revolutionizing brain and mental health.

New thinking about cognition, brain and mind:

Emerging toolkit for brain health & enhancement:

News about the 2017 SharpBrains Virtual Summit (December 5-7th):

And finally, a couple of fun brain teasers to start the week of the right foot:

 

Have a great month of November!

The SharpBrains Team

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In honor of Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, let’s discuss 10 Key Facts To Harness Brain Plasticity And Prolong Brain Health

June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, so let me share 10 Key Facts to harness brain plasticity & prolong brain health that come from the hundreds of scientific and medical studies we analyzed to prepare the book The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness: How to Improve Brain Health and Performance at Any Age:

  • 1. Genes do not determine the fate of our brains (not even the infamous APOE4). Thanks to lifelong neuroplasticity, our lifestyles are as important as our genes-if not even more important- in determining how our brains grow and our minds evolve.
  • 2. There is more than one “It” in “Use It or Lose It” — our performance depends on a variety of brain functions and cognitive skills, not just one (be it “attention” or “memory” or any other).
  • 3. Physical exercise and increased fitness promote brain functioning through a variety of mechanisms, such as increased brain volume, blood supply and growth hormone levels. In particular, cardiovascular exercise seems to bring the greatest brain benefits.
  • 4. Mental stimulation strengthens the connections between neurons (synapses), improving neuron survival and cognitive functioning and building your cognitive reserve–which helps your brain better cope with normal aging and Alzheimer’s pathology in the long-term.
  • 5. The only leisure activity that has been associated with reduced cognitive function is watching television. What could explain that? Well, routine, passive activities do not challenge the brain. Keeping up the challenge requires going to the next level of difficulty, trying something new, generating new thoughts and strategies and lessons learned.
  • 6. The Mediterranean Diet, supplemented with olive oil and nuts, is associated with decreased risk of cognitive decline.
  • 7. Moderate doses of caffeine increase alertness but there is no clear sustained lifetime health benefit (or harm).
  • 8. Taking “brain supplements”  does not seem to boost cognitive function or reduce risks of cognitive decline or dementia, unless directed to address an identified deficiency.
  • 9. Chronic stress reduces and can even inhibit neurogenesis. Memory and general mental flexibility are impaired by chronic stress…so it’s good to see the growing evidence that meditation and biofeedback can successfully teach users to self-regulate physiological stress.
  • 10. No size fits all…so, to improve and prolong brain function, it’s critical to understand and address individual needs and starting point.

What counts in terms of neuroplasticity and brain health is not reading this article–or any other–but practicing healthy behaviors every day. Please revisit the fact above that really grabbed your attention–ideally one that you may have overlooked and therefore may bring most “bang for the buck” now–and make a decision to try something new this summer.

To learn more:

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Update: To honor Brain Awareness Week 2017, let’s highlight 10 Key Facts To Harness Neuroplasticity And Improve Brain Fitness

Brain Awareness Week took place this month, so let’s first of all discuss these 10 Key Facts to Harness Neuroplasticity & Improve Brain Fitness coming from the hundreds of scientific and medical studies we analyzed to prepare the book The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness: How to Improve Brain Health and Performance at Any Age.

And here’s the rest of SharpBrains’ March e-newsletter exploring the latest in brain health and mental performance.

New research:

New thinking:

New tools (via SharpBrains’ analysis of neurotech patents):

Finally, here’s a brain teaser to test your pattern recognition and other cognitive skills: The Empty Triangle.

Have a nice Spring!

The SharpBrains Team

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5 quick brain teasers to sharpen two key cognitive skills: attention and working memory

Looking for some fun–and free–cognitive stimulation over the weekend? Here you have a few quick brain teasers to challenge your atten­tion and your work­ing mem­ory (work­ing mem­ory is the capacity to keep infor­ma­tion in your mind while working on processing and integrating it)

Please give them a try…they are not as easy as they may seem 🙂 Read the rest of this entry »

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Brain teasers to help teens and adults test cognitive skills…and cognitive biases

brainteaser_considerlindaBrain teaser: Please con­sider Linda, a 31-year-old woman, sin­gle and bright. When she was a stu­dent, in high school and in col­lege too, she was deeply involved in social jus­tice issues, and also par­tic­i­pated in environmental protests. Which is more prob­a­ble about Linda’s occu­pa­tion today? Read the rest of this entry »

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