Archive for Cognitive Neuroscience

Let’s discuss how to Outsmart Smart Technology to Reclaim our Health and Focus

I’m excited to share that the upcoming 2019 SharpBrains Virtual Summit will feature, on May 8th, a fascinating presentation and discussion with Dr. Margaret Morris, who spent 13 years as a researcher at Intel and recently wrote a very timely book — Left to Our Own Devices: Outsmarting Smart Technology to Reclaim Our Relationships, Health, and Focus (MIT Press, 2018).

Please learn more about the fantastic Summit Agenda and consider joining us!

To better understand Dr. Morris’ work and insights you can read this great book review over at Psychiatric Times:

Morris is a skillful storyteller and takes that challenge to task. Across eight easy-to-read chapters, she illustrates how people, most likely younger users, “hack” technologies to foster connection, mindfulness, and well-being. The chapters are centered around a collection of personal narratives from people who personalized their digital devices and experience positive results. Morris records these stories with a gentle, engaging, and upbeat tone that requires no formal background in either mental health or technology … This book is a good read for today’s digital health initiatives and for clinicians hoping to keep up to date in current trends in mental health technology. It reminds us that putting a device in a patient’s hands will often lead to outcomes that we could never have imagined. It also pokes holes in the once reigning view that robotics and chatbots are dehumanizing and antisocial. If anything, the narratives suggest that technology can help patients monitor their emotional states and improve sharing and connections. The book underscores how useful it is to study how patients use apps in real-world settings and to learn from their lived experiences.

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What will neurotechnology look like in 10-20 years?

Credit: University of Nottingham

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Will it be about a new generation of portable brain scanners that can significantly lower the price of research, like the one being developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham and University College London in the UK?

Or will it be about sophisticated neural interfaces, like the ones the US military is working on, to change the ways our minds interact with the world around us?

Or, perhaps, will it be about inexpensive, data-rich approaches to detect patterns in your smartphone usage and detect mental health and brain disorders in their early stages — such as what MindStrong HealthNeuraMetrix and others are already doing?

–> Continue reading We need to rethink neuroscience. And you can help us, over at the World Economic Forum.

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5 Facts You Need To Know To Understand, Navigate And Enjoy The Digital Brain Health Revolution

Hundreds of companies around the globe, now including Elon Musk’s Neuralink and even Facebook,  are researching and developing new ways to help brain owners be smarter, sharper, and healthier.

What explains this flurry of activity? Where may it be headed?

To help you understand what’s going on, let me highlight five key facts that emerged from the recent SharpBrains Virtual Summit, where 200+ participants in 16 countries shared and discussed the latest about neurotech­nolo­gy, brain health and digital health.

 

Fact 1. There are 7.5 billion human brains out there, and everyone needs help

Consider all unmet needs derived from the traditional pharma-exclusive approach to brain health.

Learning and cognitive disabilities in children are growing significantly, from ADHD and OCD, to autism. The related emotional and economic burden is substantial — yet, over 60-70% of those with treatment have poor outcomes, and many who need help don’t get any.
Read the rest of this entry »

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Neuroplasticity: Past, Present and Future

— One of Ramón y Cajal’s iconic images, showing a Purkinje neuron with its treelike structure

The Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis hosts a wonderful temporary exhibit highlighting the medical illustrations of neuroplasticity pioneer Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Titled The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, it will remain open until May 21st, 2017.

Who was Ramón y Cajal? Why does his research on neuroscience and neuroplasticity matter? Keep reading article over at The Creativity Post.

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Top 10 SharpBrains Articles of 2015

These are the 10 most popular articles with sharpbrains.com readers in 2015, covering everything brain-related from latest research findings to healthy living tips and emerging neurotechnologies:

1. Can you grow your hippocampus? Yes. Here’s how, and why it matters

2. To harness neuroplasticity, start with enthusiasm

brain_hands_large3. The Ten Habits of Highly Effective Brains

4. How learning changes your brain

5. Why you turn down the radio when you’re lost

6. 10 neu­rotech­nolo­gies about to trans­form brain enhance­ment and brain health

7. What are cognitive abilities and how to boost them?

8. 8 Tips To Remember What You Read

9. Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging

10. Six tips to build resilience and prevent brain-damaging stress

 

We hope you enjoy them, and share your favorites with other sharp friends and colleagues! To stay on top of new articles and resources, you can follow us via Facebook, TwitterLinkedIn and our eNewsletter.

Have a great 2016!

Alvaro Fernandez & the SharpBrains Team

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Upcoming market report on Pervasive Neurotechnology

Just a quick heads-up to the SharpBrains community: we are wrapping up a comprehensive market report on Pervasive Neurotechnologies (non-invasive, scalable, potentially ubiquitous). To learn when it becomes available, keep tuned via our e-Newsletter.

See below, in alphabetical order, some of the organizations to be profiled in the report, given their relevant intellectual property portfolios (primarily patents). Read the rest of this entry »

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MIT study: Maturity brings richer memories

MIT study: Maturity brings richer memories
MIT News, MA -MIT neuroscientists exploring how memory formation differs between children and adults have found that although the two groups have much in common,…”

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